1. roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

    roachpatrol:

    jetgreguar:

    allrightcallmefred:

    fredscience:

    The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

    I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

    Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

    The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

    Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

    I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

    this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

    FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

    (via starklawz)

    2 hours ago  /  16,745 notes  /  Source: fredscience

  2. the-amecan-icecreamery:

    So many drabbles, so little time. This is my modern!witch AU, with young witch-in-training Emily moving with her father from their more isolated magical home to the much less magical suburbs for… reasons. And from there meeting her neighbor Matthew under… interesting circumstances.

    (Yes this is 1pCan1pNyoCan.)

    Anyways, long explanation short, her spell clipped somewhere near his eyes, hence the headaches and all that. And yes, there are side effects, though those will only be seen… If this drabble is continued by someone. (Probably me because no one else really has the interest or inclination to. :C )

    “Oh no, oh no oh no oh no…” Emily groaned, immediately checking on the poor man she’d just accidentally knocked out with an errant spell. Flying Mint Bunny fluttered overhead, looking extremely guilty that her dive to dodge said spell had made him a target in the first place.

    At the least, he was still alive - thank goodness it was just a stunner and not something more serious. Unfortunately, the plate he’d brought with him, stacked neatly with cookies, could not say the same, and she briefly mourned what looks liked absolutely delicious treats.

    The moment passed quickly, more pressing concerns coming to the fore. She couldn’t leave the poor guy out here on the street, and she wasn’t really sure which house he lived in (plus it’d be really awkward if his door was locked and she had to explain why she was carrying an unconscious guy around to the new neighbors), so with some effort (and a bit of help from Minty) she managed to carry him inside and settle him on the couch.

    Read More

    2 hours ago  /  3 notes  /  Source: the-amecan-icecreamery

  3. I feel like we need some clarification

    pepsie:

    spider-poop:

    scientificperfection:

    elluka-clockworker:

    fortunatossoliloquy:

    This is a Kimono (Japanese):

    image

    This is a Hanfu (Chinese):

    image

    This is a Cheongsam (Chinese):

    image

    This is a Hanbok (Korean):

    image

    Any questions? 


    ao dai
    (vietnamese)

    image

    I just wanna say, the exact type of kimono shown is a Furisode. One with long arms. |’D

    God I love traditional dresses

    There’s also yukata:

    image

    Happi:

    image

    Samue:

    image

    Hakama:

    image

    And jinbei:

    image

    Those are all Japanese. ashdkshdjkh

    people on DA need this very badly gfhjkal

    (via dont-resist-the-water)

    11 hours ago  /  121,976 notes  /  Source: yunhokun

  4. notthatfdupyousay:

talkliterarysymbolismtome:

#woah that arrow nearly hit me there #that was close #hey wait what #oh it’s ping #what’s he doing up there #oh wow he did the thing #there’s hope for him yet #wow that’s impressive actually #I am really proud #I feel my manliness being pierced with a spear of emotion #and he looks great with the early morning sun behind him #I mean what #what is this #something in me is stirring #i don’t #this doesn’t #I can’t be thinking this #why am I thinking this #hang on #am i #gAY

ping did the thing and now my thing is doing the tingaling

    notthatfdupyousay:

    talkliterarysymbolismtome:

    #woah that arrow nearly hit me there #that was close #hey wait what #oh it’s ping #what’s he doing up there #oh wow he did the thing #there’s hope for him yet #wow that’s impressive actually #I am really proud #I feel my manliness being pierced with a spear of emotion #and he looks great with the early morning sun behind him #I mean what #what is this #something in me is stirring #i don’t #this doesn’t #I can’t be thinking this #why am I thinking this #hang on #am i #gAY

    ping did the thing and now my thing is doing the tingaling

    (via starklawz)

    1 day ago  /  92,784 notes  /  Source: mickey-magical

  5. abigaillarson:

laughcentre:

oceanmaster:



THIS IS THE CUTEST MOTHER FUCKING THING ON THIS SITE I WANT TO CRY

Having a bad day? NOT ANYMORE.

    abigaillarson:

    laughcentre:

    oceanmaster:

    image

    THIS IS THE CUTEST MOTHER FUCKING THING ON THIS SITE I WANT TO CRY

    Having a bad day? NOT ANYMORE.

    (via starklawz)

    1 day ago  /  417,950 notes  /  Source: rollingbarrel

  6. crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

    crusherccme:

    found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

    (via starklawz)

    1 day ago  /  191,139 notes  /  Source: crusherccme

  7. titansxarexmyxtrigger:

    the-leader-in-red:

    johncougar:

    weirdvvolf:

    papauera:

    lofticri3s:

    image

    This was recorded by the Portsmouth Sinfonia in an experiment where all the members of the orchestra would swap instruments with each other and attempt to play them to the best of their ability.

    favorite things about this

    • literally all the brass starts to get the hang of it and then the crescendos happen and everyone is like FUCK FUCK FUCK??? FUCK. JUST. BLOW RLY HARD.
    • the strings are lazy but also the same. like u can tell a lot of the ppl w/ the stringed instruments may already basically know how to play stringed instruments. like there’s definitely a section at the beginning where you hear a good portion going “oh yeah this is like. a smaller/bigger version of what i do.”
    • all you hear of any woodwinds is just “pffffttt??? pFFFTTTT???? PFFFFFTTTT I SAID PFFFFTTTT!!!!!” bc woodwinds are fucking HARD and you hear after like the first crescendo half of them just give up. they give up. they’re done. fuck this it tastes weird and my lips hurt.
    • that trumpet. that person is fucking TRYING man they fucking GOT this. they may not have figured out notes but they figured out LOUD and they GOT this.

    I JUST DIED

    I SEARCHED THIS POST FOR AGES OH MY GOD

    Sounds like the beginning of Insidious.

    (via starklawz)

    1 day ago  /  535,497 notes  /  Source: skypevevo

  8. grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDSMore on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.Norm

    grizandnorm:

    Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

    More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

    Norm

    (via katebishcp)

    1 day ago  /  9,123 notes  /  Source: grizandnorm

  9. Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched.
    – Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth   (via dilfcomplex)

    (via ohmykorra)

    1 day ago  /  73,432 notes  /  Source: ynannarising